American Society For Nutrition

Program

Program

Excellence in Nutrition Research and Practice

Speakers will be added to the program as they are confirmed. Please check back often or see our newsletters for updates.

Onsite Registration, Badge/Bag Pickup Open, Poster Check in (Posters up all day)

7:00 am-6:00 pm

Welcome and Introduction

8:00 am-8:10 am

Program Chair: Matthew Waldron, PhD, University of Missouri

Metabolism Symposium

8:10 am-10:10 am

“Impact of Metabolism on Human Health, Companion Animal Health and Farm Health and Production”

Speaker: James Ntambi, MSc, PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This keynote presentation will discuss metabolic regulation, especially as it relates to lipid metabolism and obesity, and how this relates to the biomedical and agricultural interventions or therapies to improve human health, companion animal health and farm health and production. The talk will explain any broader national and international trends related to metabolism and how humans, companion animals and farm animals may be affected. Current research about related disease states or developmental abnormalities will also be presented to illustrate the broader impact of metabolism.

“Development of Models of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome”

Speaker: Michael Spurlock, PhD, Iowa State University

This keynote reaction and application talk will discuss current translational research concerning how models of obesity and metabolic syndrome may be used to improve human health, companion animal health and farm health and production. Among topics discussed will be mechanisms underlying inflammation in adipose tissue and insulin resistance in relation to obesity. Potential interventions or therapies for a variety of human and animal conditions will be considered.

“Integration of Molecular Biology, Cell and Whole-Organism Physiology in Metabolism Research”

Speaker: Sean Adams, MS, PhD, USDA-ARS Western Human Nutrition Research Center

This keynote reaction and application talk will present current translational research concerning how molecular biology, cell culture approaches, and whole-organism physiology may be used to improve human health, companion and farm animal health and production.  Molecular markers and endocrine factors that correlate with indices of metabolic health in human nutritional studies and in animal models of obesity will be discussed, with a primary focus on identification of cross-talk among disparate systems. Potential interventions for human and animal metabolic conditions will be considered.

Panel Discussion

Developmental Origin of Adult Disease Symposium

10:15 am-12:15 pm

“Impact of Developmental Environment on the Risk of Chronic Disease”

Speaker: Peter Nathanielsz, MD, PhD, Co-Director Center for Pregnancy and Newborn Research, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio.

This keynote presentation will discuss the effects of maternal obesity and the fetal environment, especially under-nutrition and caloric restriction, on health and disease in later life.These environmental effects will be discussed relative to the biomedical and agricultural interventions or therapies to improve human health, companion animal health and farm health and production. The talk will consider any broader national and international socio-economic and medical trends related to developmental origins and how humans, companion animals and farm animals may be affected. Information about related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, and some forms of cancer will also be presented to illustrate the broader impact of environment on risk of chronic disease.

“Fetal Origins of Adult Disease”

Speaker: Stephen Ford, MS, PhD, University of Wyoming

This keynote reaction and application talk will present current translational research concerning how fetal origins of adult disease may be used to improve human health, companion animal health and farm health and production. Conceptus-uterine interactions throughout gestation and the impacts of early gestational undernutrition on fetal growth and development as well as offspring health and growth efficiency will be discussed. Potential interventions or therapies for a variety of human and animal conditions will be considered.

“Gestational Nutrition and Placental Effects on Health and Productivity”

Speaker: Lawrence Reynolds, PhD, North Dakota State University

This keynote reaction and application talk will present current translational research concerning how domestic animal models may be used to improve animal and human nutrition, animal production and biomedicine. Discussion will be in the context how the uterine environment and gestational nutrition affect fetal and placental growth and development and, consequently, life-long health and productivity of humans and livestock. Potential interventions or therapies for a variety of human and animal conditions will be considered.

Panel Discussion

Poster Viewing/Lunch on own or satellite

12:15 pm-1:50 pm

Infectious (Zoonotic) Diseases Symposium

1:50 pm-3:50 pm

“Microbial Endocrinology - Interactions of Nutrition, Host Physiology, and Microbes that impact Infectious Disease”

Speaker: Mark Lyte, PhD, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

This keynote presentation will discuss the role of endocrine cross-talk between enteric microbes and the host, and how these microbes contribute to the pathogenesis of infectious disease in humans and animals. The talk will explain any broader national and international trends related to intestinal and microbiologic issues and how humans, companion animals and farm animals may be affected. Current research about related disease states or developmental abnormalities will also be presented to illustrate the broader impact.

“Interventions to Reduce Pathogens in Swine and Cattle”

Speaker: Todd Callaway,PhD, USDA Texas A&M University

This reaction and application talk will discuss current translational research to identify ecological factors impacting zoonotic and enteropathogens within the gut and determine if the host's hormonal status can be exploited to develop alternatives to antibiotics in order to improve food safety, human and animal health. Potential interventions or therapies for a variety of human and animal conditions will be considered.

“Enteric microbial ecology and etiology of inflammatory bowel disease – what can we learn from the canine model?”

Speaker: Jan Suchodolski, PhD, Texas A&M University, Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences 

This reaction and application talk will discuss current translational research concerning the microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract, specifically focusing on the role of commensal intestinal microbiota in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the canine.  Genetic, microbial, and immune interactions in the etiopathogenesis of IBD will be discussed and potential interventions or therapies for a variety of human and animal conditions will be considered.

Panel Discussion

Nutritional Impact of Pro-inflammatory Response Symposium

3:55 pm -5:55 pm

“Impact of Nutrition on the Inflammatory Response in the Developing Gut and Liver”

Speaker: Doug Burrin,MS, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine

This keynote presentation will discuss how nutrition during early development affects the inflammatory response and resultant impact on nutritional physiology and metabolism in humans and animals. The speaker will present evidence demonstrating the unique suitability of domestic pigs as a model for human infant inflammatory diseases, such as necrotizing enterocolitis and hepatic cholestasis. The talk will highlight how inflammation triggered by these diseases affects whole body glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in the short- and long-term stages of development. The relevance to human health and domestic animal growth potential will be discussed.

“The Cost of Immune Protection – Nutritional Accounting and Production Efficiency”

Speaker: Kirk C. Klaing, PhD, University of California, Davis

This reaction and application talk will discuss current translational research concerning how the immune response affects nutritional requirements and how productive and reproductive efficiency are altered following immune activation. Nutritional strategies or interventions to boost immune defenses and minimize the clinical insults on productivity for a variety of human and animal conditions will be considered.

“Sculpting the Optimal Immune Response”

Speaker:  Mark Cook, PhD, University of Wisconsin- Madison

This reaction and application talk will discuss current translational research describing the potential to model the ideal immune response.Potential nutritional strategies and interventions such as vaccinations directed toward host inflammatory molecules in order to limit inflammatory damage and improve human health, companion animal health, and farm animal health and production will be considered.

Panel Discussion

Awards and Evening Cocktail Reception

6:00 pm -7:30 pm