American Society For Nutrition

The Microbiome Webinar Series

The Microbiome Webinar Series

Excellence in Nutrition Research and Practice

An educational activity organized by the American Society for Nutrition's
Nutritional Science Council

The American Society for Nutrition's (ASN) Nutritional Sciences Council is organizing a series of webinars to describe the different approaches used to characterize the human microbiome, review current knowledge about gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota and obesity, and discuss the interactive role of GI microbiota and nutrition in chronic health and disease.

In this webinar series, four, approximately one-hour webinars will be conducted. Each webinar will feature two presentations by researchers and include time for an interactive question and answer session. Each program will be presented live and archived for on-demand viewing.

CPE: ASN designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.5 CPEU per webinar. Dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. ASN (Provider #NS010) is accredited and approved by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) as a provider of Continuing Professional Education (CPE) programs for Registered Dietitians.

Learning Level 2

In order to claim credits you must fill out an evaluation per webinar, after which you will be directed to a webpage with the CPE certificate. Please note, that if you do not supply you name and email on the evaluation, ASN can not provide evidence should you get audited by the accrediting body, CDR. 

Content: The human GI tract harbors trillions of microorganisms, most of which are commensal and have adapted over time to the milieu of the human colon. The mutualistic relationship between the intestinal microbiota (particularly bacteria) and their mammalian host is thought to be influenced, at least in part, by diet. Consumption of various nutrients and other food components affects the structure of the microbial community and provides substrates for microbial metabolism. Not only can eating patterns modify microbial community structure, but microorganisms can also generate new compounds from food components. Some of these compounds are beneficial while others may be harmful. Many of the specific bacteria taxa, as well as microbially-generated metabolites, may have a role in health and disease development. Researchers are making significant headway in understanding not just what the bacteria do but also how they influence health and disease, especially through their interaction with diet. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technology, along with the development of metagenomics and bioinformatics tools, have provided opportunities to characterize the microbial communities in a less biased way than was previously available using culture-dependent techniques. Furthermore, studies using germ-free animals have shed light on how GI microbiota are involved in modulating nutritional status and health.


Webinar 1: What is the microbiome and what is the evidence that diet can modify GI bacteria?

May 6th at 1pm ET 

Click here to view recording. 

CPE Evaluation.  

Learning Objectives: At the end of this program, attendees will be able to:

- Define the human microbiome.

- Describe the NIH Human Microbiome Project (HMP) and its tools developed for the research community.

- Describe the evidence on the effect of diet on the GI microbial community structure.

Speakers:

Lita Proctor, PhD, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health 

James Lewis, MD, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania


Webinar 2: The GI microbiota: How do you determine who is there and what they are doing?

May 18th at 1pm ET

Click here to view recording.

CPE Evaluation.  

Learning Objectives: At the end of this program, attendees will be able to:

- Explain how “multi-omic” technology can be utilized to understand the role of GI microbiota in health and disease.

- Define the microbiome quality control project

- Describe the American Gut Project and how it will provide information on the effects of diet and exercise on the microbiome.

- Describe laboratory and bioinformatics tools in development for microbiome analysis.

Speakers:

Curtis Huttenhower, PhD, Harvard School of Public Health 

Owen R. White, PhD, University of Maryland School of Medicine


Webinar 3: What is the role of GI microbiota in obesity?

June 4 at 1pm ET

Click here to view recording. 

CPE Evaluation.  

Learning Objectives: At the end of this program, attendees will be able to:

·Describe the relationship between GI microbes and obesity.

·Explain how germ-free animal models have been utilized to understand the relationship between the microbiome and obesity.

·Describe findings from human studies on the microbiome and obesity.

·Explain how gastric bypass surgery influences GI microbiota.

Speakers:

Andrew Gewirtz, PhD, Georgia State University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences 

Lee Kaplan, MD, PhD, Massachusetts General Hospital


Webinar 4: What are the independent and interactive roles of GI microbiota and nutrition in modifying chronic disease risk?

June 17th at 1pm ET 

Click here to view recording. 

CPE Evaluation.  

Learning Objectives: At the end of this program, attendees will be able to:

·Describe the relationship between diet, GI microbiota and cardiovascular disease.

·Describe the relationship between diet, GI microbiota and cancer.

Speakers:

W. H. Wilson Tang, MD, Cleveland Clinic, OH

Johanna Lampe, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington