American Society For Nutrition

The Real Scoop on Chia Seeds

The Real Scoop on Chia Seeds

Excellence in Nutrition Research and Practice
Posted on 03/19/2012 at 01:29:29 PM by Student Blogger
By Jessica Currier

I'm sure most of you remember the chia pet, the clay figurines with sprouts of chia to resemble hair or fur, or at least the jingle on their advertisement, “Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia!” If you haven't heard already, you probably will soon, people are now consuming chia seeds for the added health benefits. Who would have thought that a garden ornament could be ingested to promote health and vitality?
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Chia seeds are from the desert plant Salvia hispanica, a member of the mint family, and can be eaten raw or added to dishes (1). Consumers add chia to baked goods, breads, porridges, smoothies, and can be ground and added to water or milk. The seeds can be purchased at local health food stores or online. The familiar chia hair or sprouts can also be eaten and added to salads, sandwiches, and other dishes (1). Numerous claims can be found in the media concerning chia. Chia being an excellent source of fiber, omega-3 fatty acids, protein, and antioxidants are some of the proposed claims. The media also claims that chia can help cut cravings, balance blood sugar levels, improve cardiovascular disease, lower cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and can promote weight loss. This exceptional list of health benefits really peaked my interest to find out the real scoop concerning chia seeds.

It is true that chia seeds do provide omega-3 fatty acids and contain fiber, antioxidants, protein, and minerals (1). While claims of weight loss and decreases in daily cravings may be a bit far fetched, increases in satiety due to the fiber and protein content may be valid. A study conducted by Nieman and Colleagues concluded that ingestion of 50g/d of chia seeds for 12 weeks did not influence body mass, composition, or disease risk factors in overweight/obese men and women (2). A recent study published in The Journal of Nutrition viewed the effects of a specific dietary pattern on Metabolic Syndrome (3). Sixty-seven participants with Metabolic Syndrome were involved in the study and were given a mixture to drink twice a day. The mixture chosen was based on antihyperglycemic, antihyperinsulinemic, hypolipidemic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidants effects (3). Chia seeds were included in this mixture because of the presence of fatty acids and antioxidants that promote a reduction in the inflammatory response (3). This study concluded that a dietary pattern of nopal, chia seed, soy protein, and oat showed a reduction in serum triglyceride levels, serum CRP (C-Reactive Protein test, indicates acute inflammation or infection), and insulin AUC (3).

Although this study does provide encouraging outcomes, more research needs to be done with the conjunction of chia seeds helping to improve cardiovascular disease, lowering cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and weight loss promotion (1). Little published research concerning chia exists, and most information available is based on lab animals not humans (1). So remember, be an informed consumer with a critical eye when reviewing media claims. If you are looking for fiber or antioxidants, chia seeds would be a great addition to your diet; but for weight loss, stick with good old exercise and healthy food choices!


References:

1) Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics. What are Chia seeds? Are There Health Benefits?  

2) Nieman DC, Cayea EJ, Austin MD, Henson DA, McAnulty SR, Jin F. Chia seed does not promote weight loss or alter disease risk factors in overweight adults. Nutr Res. 2009;29:414- 418.

3) Guevara-Cruz M, Tovar A, Aguilar-Salinas C, Medina-Vera I, Gil-Zenteno L, Hernandez-Viveros I, Lopez-Romero P, Ordaz-Nava G, Canizales-Quinteros S, Guillen Pineda L, Torres N. A Dietary Pattern Including Nopal, Chia Seed, Soy Protein, and Oat Reduces Serum Triglycerides and Glucose Intolerance in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome. J. Nutr. 2012;142:64-69.



5 Comments

I'm interested in the Omega 3 content of the chia seeds. How much omega 3 can we get from, say, 50g of the seeds?


50g of dried chia seeds contain 18g of fat, with 10g of that being represented as ALA (a short chain omega-3). ALA is only useful to your body because it can be converted into EPA and DHA, albeit at a substantially low rate. The study with the most liberal results to date indicates that only 15% of ALA gets converted into the more useful EPA & DHA, while another study reported a conversion rate of only 0.2%


“Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia!” I am going to start having chia seeds very soon.


chia seeds do provide omega-3 fatty acids and contain fiber, antioxidants, protein, and minerals (1)

yeah, those things are helping us out !


The benefits of chia are many, we should try to integrate it into our daily lives to stay healthy